Kodak

Kodak probably made the most different filmstocks on super8. That isn’t strange since Kodak invented super8 and is the king when it comes to making film emulsions.

Almost every cartridge you see on this page are no longer available. If you want to know more about the history visit the Kodak Chronology pages for more dates.

Ektachrome 7285

Kodak Ektachrome 100D super8
Color reversal film, type 7285 (50 feet)
EI 100/21° for daylight [5500K, without filter]
EI 25/15° for Tungsten [3200K, with Wratten 80A filter]
One of the most beautiful super8 colour reversal films ever made and it is a real pitty that I can no longer sell this film, Kodak does not produce it annymore, they replace it in 2018 with Ektachrome 100D 7294 film.

WittnerChrome 100D

WittnerChrome 100D super8
Colour reversal (50 feet)
EI 100 ISO/21DIN daylight (without filter)
It is made from Kodak 7285 Ektachrome film. A great product from Wittner Cinetec Germany. They loaded and sold it for a few years, they stopped making this when Kodak decided to put their own film in their own super8 cartridge in 2018. If you use this film in tungsten light conditions use a 80A filter.

Ektachrome 7280

Kodak Ektachrome 64T super8
Colour reversal film, type 7280 (50 feet)
EI 40 daylight [filter 85B]
EI 64 Tungsten [no filter]
The production of this almost classic film has stopped recently in May 2010 (source Kodak).

Plus-X 7265

Kodak Plus-X super8
Black & white reversal film, type 7265 (50 feet)
EI 100 daylight [without filter]
EI 80 Tungsten [without filter]
The Plus-X reversal film has been discontinued in April 2010 (source Kodak).
It still is a great product if you can find it somewhere. The test results are showing that black/white reversal stock is beautiful. It has a beautiful deep black, fine grain, is very clear and sharp and 1 stop more sensitive that the old 7276. Do not forget to check you’re automatic exposure when you use this type, not all camera’s can read the film right. If you’re new with this film, you could make a test exposure first. Best used when there is enough light available.

Plus-X 7276

Kodak Plus-X super8
Black and white reversal film, type 7276 (50 feet)
I personally never liked this film.

Kodak 7278

Kodak Tri-X super8
Black and white reversal film, type 7278
Recently replaced by Kodak Tri-X 7266 Tri-X.
A good black and white film that has always been a favourite of this lab but not available any more, Kodak stopped production and made 7266 which is also much better. Still very good to be developed, nice grains.

Kodachrome 40

Kodak Kodachrome 40 super8
Colour reversal, type 7268 type A (50 feet)
If we speak about super8 we automatically speak about Kodachrome. This was the most beautiful film on the world. Read an article from the New York Times here.
The S8RL became the European partner of Film Rescue International from Canada in the middle of 2012. Film Rescue is capable of processing all types of Kodachrome K-II, K-25 or K40 for you in any film size [still, super8, double8, 16mm for example]. It is very very important to know and to be aware that Kodachrome films can ONLY be developed into black/white negative films. Send us your film and we handle the rest.

Kodachrome II

Kodak Kodachrome II super8
Colour reversal (50 feet)
It is very very important to know and to be aware that Kodachrome II films can ONLY be developed into black/white negative films. Send us your film and we handle the rest.

Ektachrome 40

Kodak Ektachrome 40 super8
Colour reversal (50 feet)
EI 40 ASA Tungsten
We can develop this type of film since our co-operation with Canada. By combining knowledge from Film Recue with that from S8RL.

Ektachrome 160

Kodak Ektachrome 160 super8
Colour reversal (50 feet)
EI 160 Tungsten
EI 100 ASA Daylight
It’s possible to process this film, the results are very good and the colour is slightly yellow. This is a box from 1996 and the images shot with this film are edited in a Nike commercial. Make sure you can read EM-26 on the label.

Ektachrome 160

Kodak Ektachrome 160 super8
Colour reversal (50 feet)
EI 160 ASA Tungsten
EI 100 ASA Daylight
This Kodak Ektachrome film is a little older and result aren’t that good. This box originates from 1983.